Aug 20

Sydney New Year’s Eve: Damien James O’Neil, 40, charged over online threats

NSW Deputy Police Commissioner Catherine Burn says people should ”remain vigilant” on New Year’s Eve.A 40-year-old man has been charged by counter-terrorism police with making online threats relating to Sydney’s New Year’s Eve celebrations.
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Damien James O’Neil was arrested as he got off a flight from London on Thursday.

Police will allege Mr O’Neil, from Chippendale in inner Sydney, uploaded a document to the online blog hosting site Live Journal in which he threatened to kill or maim random members of the public on New Year’s Eve.

Police attached to the Terrorism Investigation Squad were investigating posts allegedly made by Mr O’Neil after a tip-off from a member of the public.

Police raided his home in Regent Street, Chippendale and an inner-west storage facility where items including documents and hard drives were seized.

He has been charged with “Documents containing threats contrary to Section 31 Crimes Act 1900 concerning online blogs”.

Mr O’Neil chose not to appear on screen in Parramatta Bail Court on Friday and his Legal Aid solicitor did not apply for bail.

Deputy Commissioner Catherine Burn said the matter was “an isolated incident”.

“As a consequence, we are confident that there are no current or specific threats to New Year’s Eve and, while we ask people to remain vigilant, people should enjoy the celebrations.”

Acting Deputy Commissioner Frank Mennilli said the man, who was known to police for “minor matters”, had not been charged with a terrorist offence.

“The person was acting in isolation, he has no links to any cultural groups or groups that that have been identified,” he said.

“He did post on social media a number of threats of some possible activity that he could be undertaking. It clearly showed how vigilant the NSW police and its partners are, because he was arrested immediately and he has been placed before the court.

“The matter is still under investigation and there may be some further charges, but I can certainly assure everyone there is no current threat from that individual or any other person.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Aug 20

Davis Hayes as excited as the rest of the racing world over the debut of Black Caviar’s daughter

David Hayes with Black Caviar’s daughter Oscietra on Friday. Photo: Eddie JimDavid Hayes has stood before microphones at press conferences for decades but the trainer admits that Friday morning’s media conference to discuss the debut performance of champion race mare Black Caviar’s daughter, Oscietra, was different to any other he had been involved in.
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Hayes said that he and his much decorated father, Colin, had prepared champions as well as brothers and sisters of champions, but since Oscietra had walked into his Euroa training operation the media momentum had gathered significantly.

Just 48 hours before Oscietra makes her racecourse debut at Flemington over 1000 metres on Sunday a final question-and-answer session was under way at Hayes’ Flemington stable.

“I must admit that I was a great fan of Black Caviar, I followed her everywhere and was always taken with her performances, but I must admit I didn’t expect the media rush that we’ve had in the last four weeks when it appeared this filly would be making her debut.

“We’ve had some beautifully bred horses come through our stables in the last half century but none have drawn this sort of media attention.

“I’ve got a beautiful filly at home that’s a daughter of one of the best mares I’ve ever trained, Miss Finland, and no one’s asked a question.”

However, the trainer explained to the group that Oscietra was just one of a 100-strong two-year-old intake that had come through his Euroa and Flemington stables this season.

“There is no favouritism, no matter what you’re by or out of, you are on equal terms to the next two-year-old.  And when you show you can go faster and faster, that’s when I get more worried and more worried, but it’s a nice problem to have,” he said.

Black Caviar went through her remarkable career as an unbeaten sprinter who was successful in nearly every state of Australia and also in England.

Luke Nolen, who formed such a remarkable bond with Black Caviar, will be aboard Oscietra on Sunday, but according to Hayes, there will be no need for any instructions.

“He’ll know what to do, he’s trialled her twice, the form in those trials seems to be fairly strong so that’s very much a significant yardstick,” he said.

TAB fixed odds are not offering lavish odds with $1.50 on offer for Oscietra to remain unbeaten on Sunday night.

And, what is the public to expect when the barrier stalls open early on Sunday afternoon? Hayes  said: “She will be a high-class stakes winner and, put it this way, everyone around the stable is very excited about what will happen on Sunday at Flemington.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Aug 20

Russell Bell bullish Canterbury will suit Northern Territory cult hero Sirbible

Classic chance: Sirbible. Photo: Vince CaligiuriOne of the Northern Territory’s top cattle farming families and the family of one of the Top End’s former leading policemen may be linked by marriage, but it is their association with cult speedster Sirbible that will be front and centre at Canterbury on Saturday.
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Sirbible’s trainer Russell Bell calls Colac in Victoria home for now and has been campaigning his free-wheeling sprinter in Sydney of late, but he remains very much a product of the Northern Territory.

The family of Ian Kesby, who helped investigate the disappearance of British backpacker Peter Falconio, and the cattle farming Stanes clan have a son and daughter who married and Sirbible is an extension of that union.

After beating all bar The Monstar home in the Razor Sharp a fortnight ago, Bell is bullish about Sirbible’s chances in the $150,000 Canterbury Classic on New Year’s Eve.

“To me I’ve watched a lot of races at Canterbury and it makes perfect sense that it is the right track for him,” Bell said. “He likes tight tracks as everybody has seen and, if he can run at Canterbury like he runs at Moonee Valley – which I’m tipping he’s going to – it’s going to suit him down to the ground.

“Robbie Brewer said it was a five-length better gallop this week prior to his first one [before the Razor Sharp]. The horse is in super condition and he seems to be really thriving in Sydney.”

Bell has called upon South Australia veteran hoop Wayne Kerford to reunite with Sirbible to help alleviate the shortage of lightweight riders in Sydney.

“As soon as he got off the phone he was running to the airport,” Bell said. “Wayne’s a good friend of mine and I’ve said it once before he’s probably in the twilight of his career and they look for the younger guys now, but he’s got a wealth of experience and he’s won on the horse.

“Kerrin [McEvoy] rode him super last start for a bloke that’s just got on him. You don’t win Melbourne Cups and ride like he does if you’re not a champion, but ‘Bulldog’ was the top pick for a lightweight.”

Sirbible was a $10 chance with Ladbrokes on Friday for the Canterbury Classic in a market headed by His Majesty ($4.80).

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Aug 20

Test best: our cricket team of 2016

 Voges in, Smith out of ICC Test team of the year
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When it comes to picking Test cricket’s 2016 team of the year, we now know what it’s like to be a national selector. It’s not an easy caper, and there is always someone who is going to be unhappy. In this case, there are several players who could rightfully feel miffed. Josh Hazlewood, Kane Williamson, Jonny Bairstow and Moeen Ali all had strong claims – but ultimately were overlooked. Here is who we have settled on. Azhar Ali (Pakistan)

11 matches, 1198 runs at 63.05, three centuries.

Like many of his countrymen over the years, the Pakistan opener had struggled away from Asia but he has gone some way to correcting that imbalance this year. After a shaky start to the series in England, Azhar made 139 at Edgbaston – his first Test ton away from Asia – and followed up with an unbeaten double ton in Melbourne. Azhar created history by becoming the first player to score a double and triple century in day-night Tests with his 302 not out against the West Indies in Dubai. In a year in which openers have struggled, he could not be overlooked. Alastair Cook (England)

17 matches, 1270 runs at 42.33, two centuries.

His future as England captain is on shaky ground but the left-hander continues to churn out the runs. This was the fifth year, and second on the trot, in which he scored more than 1000 runs. His highlight came at Old Trafford, where he played a key role in victory over Pakistan with a double of 105 and 76 not out. Cook’s year finished on a sour note with a 4-0 hammering in the series in India, during which he came under fire for his conservative captaincy. He’s considered unlikely to be England’s skipper for next summer’s Ashes, and he won’t be leading this team either. Joe Root (England)

17 matches, 1477 runs at 49.23, three centuries.

The England strokemaker with the boyish grin finished the year narrowly ahead of teammate Johnny Bairstow as Test cricket’s leading runscorer. His determination to do well was highlighted ahead of the final Test against India in Chennai when he took to a road inside the stadium for practice, as the net facilities and even a tennis court inside the ground had been storm damaged. In line to be England’s next captain, Root began the year in fine touch in South Africa, had a flat spot at home against Sri Lanka but rebounded against Pakistan, crunching 254 in Manchester. There was only the one half-century in four innings in Bangladesh but he was one of the few consistent performers on a rugged tour of India, starting with 124 in Rajkot. Virat Kohli (India, captain)

12 matches, 1215 runs at 75.93, four centuries.

The super-fit Indian skipper has dropped weight thanks to a protein-rich diet and gruelling training program, while demanding his players also be in mint physical condition. His Test campaign began in July with a double century against the West Indies but a lean spell followed. A double ton against the Black Caps reignited his season, and he would go on to torment England, with 167 in Visakhapatnam and, in Mumbai, his third double century. His aggressive captaincy has also been praised. Steve Smith (Australia)

11 matches, 1079 runs at 71.93, four centuries.

It’s been a tumultuous year for the Australian skipper, who began by dominating the Black Caps in New Zealand (138 in Christchurch) but was unable to land a fatal blow on Sri Lanka in Australia’s opening two Tests there – both heavy defeats. He responded with a century in the final Test in Colombo but, again, his side crumbled. His 0 and 34 in the first Test against South Africa in Perth was symbolic of Australia’s woes but his character was on show when he contributed an unbeaten 48 as his team was torpedoed for 85 by the Proteas in Hobart. Handed a revamped team, he helped engineer victory in Adelaide and his century against Pakistan in Brisbane bankrolled victory. A century in Melbourne would see him notch 1000 Test runs for a third-straight year. Is improving tactically and in how he leads his side. Ben Stokes (England)

12 matches, 904 runs at 45.2, two centuries. 33 wickets at 25.81.

One of the first players picked after a breakout year. Has morphed into the game’s best allrounder, starting the year with a career-high 258 in Cape Town. A calf injury on the final day of the second Test against Pakistan derailed his home campaign but he returned for the Bangladesh tour, scoring 85 in Chittagong. He added 128 in the opening Test against India in Rajkot. His medium-pacers have provided opportune wickets, and he had a five-wicket haul in Mohali. Quinton de Kock (South Africa)

Eight matches, 695 runs at 63.18, two centuries, 33 catches.

The South African is arguably the most contentious selection in the XI. Jonny Bairstow can consider himself unlucky not to get the nod but we’ve gone for de Kock based on his superior glove work. His inclusion will undoubtedly lead to a savaging of Fairfax selectors in the media, more so when it’s revealed the time zone of Bairstow’s games was not compatible with the panel’s lifestyles. What we saw of de Kock in Australia was very impressive – with both bat and gloves. His innings in Perth and Hobart were major factors in South Africa winning the series. Ravi Ashwin (India)

12 matches, 72 wickets at 23.9, eight five-wicket hauls, three 10-wicket hauls. 

Few players have had better all-round years than this Indian spin merchant. Ashwin was instrumental in India finishing 2016 as the clear No.1 Test nation. He won matches with the ball, bamboozling England with his bounce and variations, and scored invaluable runs in the lower order. Ashwin joined the great Kapil Dev as the only Indian players to score 500 runs and take 50 wickets in a year. It’s a feat only five other players have achieved. Mitchell Starc (Australia)

Eight matches, 50 wickets at 22.58, three five-wicket hauls, one 10-wicket haul.

There was a time when Starc was better known for his deeds with the white ball but he is now one of the most feared quicks in world cricket in any format. The left-arm speed demon stood tall in a year when the Australian team unravelled. It does not bear thinking how much worse Australia’s tour of Sri Lanka would have been if not for Starc, who claimed 24 wickets at 15 in a lost cause. Fans have not seen the best of Starc this season after a nasty gash hampered his preparations but the paceman has still made crucial breakthroughs. He takes the new ball in our XI. Stuart Broad (England)

14 matches, 48 wickets at 26.56, one five-wicket haul.

Having committed to playing two spinners and using all-rounder Ben Stokes as the third seamer, selectors deliberated long and hard over who would partner Starc. Broad got the nod, only marginally though, for his ability to both attack and defend. A lot of thought was given to South Africa’s pace sensation Kagiso Rabada but the fact he does not take the new ball for his country counted against him, while Josh Hazlewood finished with a wet sail to come very close to the team.   Kagiso Rabada (South Africa)

Nine matches, 46 wickets at 23.34, four five-wicket hauls, one 10-wicket haul.

With Starc and Stuart Broad the new-ball specialists, Rabada – as he is for the Proteas – is the ideal man at first change, combining genuine speed with swing. After a modest start to his career in late 2015, he announced himself to the world in his fifth Test when he claimed 5-78 against England in Johannesburg in January. He followed this with 13 wickets for the match at Centurion. He played a pivotal role in Australia’s downfall this summer, claiming 5-92 off 31 overs in Perth as injured spearhead Dale Steyn could only look on. Former Proteas skipper Graeme Smith says Rabada is “an icon already in South African cricket”. Rangana Herath (12th man)

Nine matches, 57 wickets at 18.92, five five-wicket hauls, two 10-wicket hauls.

The 38-year-old Sri Lankan enjoyed another superb year, and almost single-handedly destroyed Australia on the mid-year tour of the sub-continent. He may be a left-arm finger spinner but it was his skidding, straight deliveries which tormented the tourists, claiming 28 wickets at a stunning average of 12.75. He also cashed in against Zimbabwe, claiming 19 wickets in two Tests. He would be the perfect partner for the off-spinning Ashwin.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Jul 22

Small businesses wade through floods in soggy Elwood

Dr Elizabeth Foo outside Laird’s pharmacy, says it’s hard to estimate the cost of the damage. Photo: Penny Stephens Andrew Sarratore from Jerry’s milk bar in Elwood: “Please slow down… or no coffee tomorrow.” Photo: Penny Stephens
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Walking into Jerry’s Milk Bar on Friday morning, one could be mistaken that Thursday’s flash floods were a distant memory. The floors of the iconic Elwood cafe are dry, the coffee machine is brewing, and customers are streaming in and out of the front door.

Perhaps that’s because owner Andrew Sarratore has learned his lesson. Being the third time since he bought the century-old business in 2010 that it fell victim to flash flooding, he now knows what to do to avoid costly damage.

On his first day in business, Mr Sarratore recalls, heavy rain swamped the place, sending what he estimates as $20,000 worth of supplies — eggs, fruit and fresh vegetables — sailing through the store. It took him six days to clean up the mess.

Four years later, when wild storms lashed the suburb, water gushed up from the drains and streamed down the road from the nearby canal, flooding the cafe yet again, says Mr Sarratore.

But this year, as he heard the rain pummel down and the canal break its banks, Mr Sarratore knew what to do.

He put crates on the road to divert traffic away from the water that had built up on the side of the road, as it struggled to make its way down the drains. To the crates he added a sign that read, “Please slow down… or no coffee tomorrow.” And he put sandbags at each of the property’s three entrances to prevent the water from making its way under the doors.

He then took a shovel and cleared the drains outside, in an effort to enable the water to pass through more easily, and when the rain eventually stopped, he took a mop and swept out any water that had made its way inside.

“Customers who live nearby offered assistance,” says Mr Sarratore. “By this morning, the place was dry and we opened as usual.”

Nearby, on Tennyson Street, an employee at the local Laird’s Pharmacy is squeezing water out of towels that had earlier lined the front door of the shop.

Inside, between serving her customers, owner Dr. Elizabeth Foo says it’s hard to estimate the cost of the damage to her newly inaugurated store.

Stock that had been shelved low to the ground was ruined. She returned to work today to discover the fridge had exceeded the optimal temperature for storing medicines — which she suspects may have occurred due to a temporary power outage — and now she must go through that stock to see if it is still viable. Meanwhile, the carpets will need to be cleaned to avoid any fungal infections.

Not only had water made its way through the two entrances to the store, despite her efforts to lay rolled-up towels at the doors, it had seeped through the roof, too.

“I put buckets on the bench to collect the water,” she says.

The flood comes just one month after the store was officially inaugurated by the Victorian Premier, Daniel Andrews, says Dr. Foo with pride, showing off photos of the occasion.

A few doors down, the washing machines are spinning at Tennyson Street Laundry. Just yesterday evening, manager Tobias Kilsby had been sweeping out water that flowed over the drain, through the back door, past the washing machines, and out the laundromat’s front entrance.

Fortunately, there was no damage to the machinery. “They’re industrial grade and their machines sit high up off the ground,” explains Mr Kilsby.

The small businesses on Ormond Road, Elwood’s main shopping strip, appear to have gotten through the flash flood scot-free.

“The water rose up high where the cars are parked outside, but it didn’t make it past the footpath,” explains Joanna Pidcock, who works at The Grumpy Swimmer bookstore.

“That was lucky for us, because water could do a lot of damage to our stock,” she says with a smile, looking at all the books and gift items stored on shelves down to the floor.

Some neighbouring stores hadn’t taken any chances. While their shopfronts bear signs saying, “Taking a break for Christmas. See you in 2017,” sandbags and towels line the front doors.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Jul 22

Melbourne weather: Small businesses wade through floods in hard-hit Elwood

Andrew Sarratore had a plan to spare Jerry’s Milk Bar in Elwood from the freak storm. Photo: Penny Stephens A warning sign for motorists at the front of Jerry’s Milk Bar. Photo: Aimee Amiga
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Dr Elizbeth Foo says it’s hard to estimate the cost of the damage to Laird’s Pharmacy in Elwood. Photo: Penny Stephens

Tobias Kilsby, manager of the Tennyson Street Laundry, had a lot of sweeping to do but was one of the luckier small business operators. Photo: Penny Stephens

Walking into Jerry’s Milk Bar on Friday morning, one could be mistaken that Thursday’s flash floods were a distant memory. The floors of the iconic Elwood cafe are dry, the coffee machine is brewing, and customers are streaming in and out of the front door.

Perhaps that’s because owner Andrew Sarratore has learned his lesson. Being the third time since he bought the century-old business in 2010 that it fell victim to flash flooding, he now knows what to do to avoid costly damage.

On his first day in business, Mr Sarratore recalls, heavy rain immersed the place in water, sending what he estimates as $20,000 worth of supplies — eggs, fruit and fresh vegetables — sailing through the store. It took him six days to clean the mess.

Four years later, when wild storms lashed the suburb, water gushed up from the drains and streamed down the road from the nearby canal, flooding the cafe again.

But this year, as he heard the rain pummel down and the canal break its banks, Mr Sarratore knew what to do.

He put crates on the road to divert traffic away from the water that had built up on the side of the road, as it struggled to make its way down the drains. To the crates he added a sign that read, “Please slow down… or no coffee tomorrow.” And he put sandbags at each of the property’s three entrances to prevent the water from making its way under the doors.

He then took a shovel and stroked the drains outside, in an effort to enable the water to pass through more easily, and when the rain eventually stopped, he took a mop and swept out any water that had made its way inside.

“Customers who live nearby offered assistance,” says Mr Sarratore. “By this morning, the place was dry and we opened as usual.”

Nearby, on Tennyson Street, an employee at the local Laird’s Pharmacy is squeezing water out of towels that had, moments earlier, lined the front door of the shop.

Inside, between serving her customers, owner Dr. Elizabeth Foo says it’s hard to estimate the cost of the damage to her newly inaugurated store.

Stock that had been shelved low to the ground was ruined. She returned to work today to discover the fridge had exceeded the optimal temperature for storing medicines — which she suspects may have occurred due to a temporary power outage — and now she must go through that stock to see if it is still viable. Meanwhile, the carpets will need to be dry cleaned to avoid any fungal infections.

Not only had water made its way through the two entrances to the premises, despite her efforts to lay rolled-up towels by the doors, it had seeped through the roof, too. “I put buckets on the bench to collect the water,” she says.

The flood comes just one month after the store was inaugurated by the Victorian Premier, Daniel Andrews, says Dr. Foo with pride, showing off photos of the momentous occasion.

A few doors down, the washing machines are spinning at Tennyson Street Laundry. Just yesterday evening, manager Tobias Kilsby had been sweeping out water that flowed over the drain, through the back door, past the washing machines, and out the laundromat’s front entrance.

Fortunately, there was no damage to the machinery. “They’re industrial grade and their motors sit high up off the ground,” explains Kilsby.

The small businesses on Ormond Road, Elwood’s main shopping strip, appear to have gotten through the flash flood scot-free.

“The water rose up high where the cars are parked outside, but it didn’t make it past the footpath,” explains Joanna Pidcock, a sales representative at The Grumpy Swimmer bookstore.

“That was lucky for us, because water could do a lot of damage to our stock,” she says with a smile, looking at all the books and gift items stored on shelves down to the floor.

Nonetheless, some neighbouring stores hadn’t taken any chances. While their shopfronts bear signs saying, “Taking a break for Christmas. See you in 2017,” sandbags and towels line the front doors.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Jul 22

Christmas gift takes the long way round

Bridie and Oliver Booth with their new T-ball set, which was found in Richmond on Boxing Day. Picture: Kimberlee BoothOliver Booth and his sister Bridie are enjoying their new T-ball set. Getting it, which took some hard work.
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Bridie Booth (5) with her brother Oliver (2). Photo: Supplied by Kez Stephenson

The Christmas gift destined for two-year-oldOliver was found in Richmond on Boxing Day after it fell out of his relatives’ car boot.

An anonymous man handed the present in atWindsor Police Station, as he waskeen to deliver it to the rightful owner.

The man had posted information about the present on social media, but had not any luck finding the right person.

A card attached to the present indicated the giftwas intended for a person named Oliver.

The Hawkesbury Local Area Command posted on Facebook about the missing item on Monday afternoon.

Within two hours, the command received a response from Oliver’s cousin Kez Stephenson.

On Facebook, Ms Stephenson wrote that her family had picked up the present and would give it to Oliver as soon as possible.

A screenshot of the Hawkesbury Local Area Command’s call out on Facebook.

Ms Stephenson told the Hawkesbury Gazette the present was intended for two-year-old Oliver Booth.

She said the present had fallen out of the family’s car on Christmas Day.

“Our boot popped open when we were driving to the family’s Christmas lunch and the present must have fallen out then,” she said.

“We didn’t notice it was missing until we were handing out presents and one of Oliver’s was missing.”

Oliver’sgrandmother delivered the present to him on Tuesday, much to the delight of Oliver and Bridie.

Oliver’s cousin Kez StephensonRobin Graham:Good work to the person who found it and turned it in. Honesty has been found.

Peter Tilbrook:Definate (sic) legend the honest bloke. Your blood is worth bottling.

Lost propertyHave you lost an item?

The NSW Police Force has now established an community portal for people to make an online report re-discover lost property.

To find out more, visithttps://portal.police.nsw.gov419论坛/

– The Hawkesbury Gazette

Jul 22

Farmer fury at ‘vigilante’ do-gooders

File photo from a piggery.A Riverina pig farmer has criticised “vigilante activists” who break the law in search of sensational photos and videos.
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Peter Cartwright has owned Pine Park Piggery near Temora for more than 30 years and is just one of 38 farmers targeted by animal liberationists who seek to expose cruel practices.

However, Mr Cartwright said he’d had hundreds of vet students through the farm over the years and wasn’t trying to hide anything.

“I checked with a consultant vet in Wagga, he looked and said unless we’d changed things dramatically we hadnothing to worry about,” Mr Cartwright said.

“We’ve opened our doors and if (the activists) had the decency to ask we’d probably have given them coffee, brekky and a guided tour, but like mongrel dogs they sneak in.”

Mr Cartwright isn’t alone in his criticism. For years, farmers have complained of break-ins and they were discussed at a private meeting between Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce and NSW police, RSPCA and NSW Farmers last year.

A summary of the meeting said piggeries in the area, along with poultry farms in other states, were known to have been “invaded for the purpose of installing unauthorised surveillance devices, ostensibly to ‘reveal’ animal husbandry practice believed to be poor”.

Outspoken animal activist Lisa Ryan had previously told Fairfax Mediathat activists were “forced to act” when regulatory bodies failed to do so.

“Theybecome so frustrated they feel they have a moral and ethical obligation to inform the community and public about what’s going on,” Ms Ryan said.“Exposing animal abuse is a very non-violent approach. If you’ve got nothing to hide then what’s the problem?”

Mr Cartwright said the activists thought they were above the law.

“Most pig farmers I know try to do the right thing, it’s in our interest to have the animals in their best condition,” he said.

“I’ve had pigs since I could stand up, I’ve been here 35 years and when people say I don’t love these animals it makes me angry.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Jul 22

Farmer fury at ‘vigilante’ do-gooders

File photo from a piggery.A Riverina pig farmer has criticised “vigilante activists” who break the law in search of sensational photos and videos.
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Peter Cartwright has owned Pine Park Piggery near Temora for more than 30 years and is just one of 38 farmers targeted by animal liberationists who seek to expose cruel practices.

However, Mr Cartwright said he’d had hundreds of vet students through the farm over the years and wasn’t trying to hide anything.

“I checked with a consultant vet in Wagga, he looked and said unless we’d changed things dramatically we hadnothing to worry about,” Mr Cartwright said.

“We’ve opened our doors and if (the activists) had the decency to ask we’d probably have given them coffee, brekky and a guided tour, but like mongrel dogs they sneak in.”

Mr Cartwright isn’t alone in his criticism. For years, farmers have complained of break-ins and they were discussed at a private meeting between Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce and NSW police, RSPCA and NSW Farmers last year.

A summary of the meeting said piggeries in the area, along with poultry farms in other states, were known to have been “invaded for the purpose of installing unauthorised surveillance devices, ostensibly to ‘reveal’ animal husbandry practice believed to be poor”.

Outspoken animal activist Lisa Ryan had previously told Fairfax Mediathat activists were “forced to act” when regulatory bodies failed to do so.

“Theybecome so frustrated they feel they have a moral and ethical obligation to inform the community and public about what’s going on,” Ms Ryan said.“Exposing animal abuse is a very non-violent approach. If you’ve got nothing to hide then what’s the problem?”

Mr Cartwright said the activists thought they were above the law.

“Most pig farmers I know try to do the right thing, it’s in our interest to have the animals in their best condition,” he said.

“I’ve had pigs since I could stand up, I’ve been here 35 years and when people say I don’t love these animals it makes me angry.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Jun 20

Farmer fury at ‘vigilante’ do-gooders

File photo from a piggery.A Riverina pig farmer has criticised “vigilante activists” who break the law in search of sensational photos and videos.
Nanjing Night Net

Peter Cartwright has owned Pine Park Piggery near Temora for more than 30 years and is just one of 38 farmers targeted by animal liberationists who seek to expose cruel practices.

However, Mr Cartwright said he’d had hundreds of vet students through the farm over the years and wasn’t trying to hide anything.

“I checked with a consultant vet in Wagga, he looked and said unless we’d changed things dramatically we hadnothing to worry about,” Mr Cartwright said.

“We’ve opened our doors and if (the activists) had the decency to ask we’d probably have given them coffee, brekky and a guided tour, but like mongrel dogs they sneak in.”

Mr Cartwright isn’t alone in his criticism. For years, farmers have complained of break-ins and they were discussed at a private meeting between Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce and NSW police, RSPCA and NSW Farmers last year.

A summary of the meeting said piggeries in the area, along with poultry farms in other states, were known to have been “invaded for the purpose of installing unauthorised surveillance devices, ostensibly to ‘reveal’ animal husbandry practice believed to be poor”.

Outspoken animal activist Lisa Ryan had previously told Fairfax Mediathat activists were “forced to act” when regulatory bodies failed to do so.

“Theybecome so frustrated they feel they have a moral and ethical obligation to inform the community and public about what’s going on,” Ms Ryan said.“Exposing animal abuse is a very non-violent approach. If you’ve got nothing to hide then what’s the problem?”

Mr Cartwright said the activists thought they were above the law.

“Most pig farmers I know try to do the right thing, it’s in our interest to have the animals in their best condition,” he said.

“I’ve had pigs since I could stand up, I’ve been here 35 years and when people say I don’t love these animals it makes me angry.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.