Jul 22

Small businesses wade through floods in soggy Elwood

Dr Elizabeth Foo outside Laird’s pharmacy, says it’s hard to estimate the cost of the damage. Photo: Penny Stephens Andrew Sarratore from Jerry’s milk bar in Elwood: “Please slow down… or no coffee tomorrow.” Photo: Penny Stephens
Nanjing Night Net

Walking into Jerry’s Milk Bar on Friday morning, one could be mistaken that Thursday’s flash floods were a distant memory. The floors of the iconic Elwood cafe are dry, the coffee machine is brewing, and customers are streaming in and out of the front door.

Perhaps that’s because owner Andrew Sarratore has learned his lesson. Being the third time since he bought the century-old business in 2010 that it fell victim to flash flooding, he now knows what to do to avoid costly damage.

On his first day in business, Mr Sarratore recalls, heavy rain swamped the place, sending what he estimates as $20,000 worth of supplies — eggs, fruit and fresh vegetables — sailing through the store. It took him six days to clean up the mess.

Four years later, when wild storms lashed the suburb, water gushed up from the drains and streamed down the road from the nearby canal, flooding the cafe yet again, says Mr Sarratore.

But this year, as he heard the rain pummel down and the canal break its banks, Mr Sarratore knew what to do.

He put crates on the road to divert traffic away from the water that had built up on the side of the road, as it struggled to make its way down the drains. To the crates he added a sign that read, “Please slow down… or no coffee tomorrow.” And he put sandbags at each of the property’s three entrances to prevent the water from making its way under the doors.

He then took a shovel and cleared the drains outside, in an effort to enable the water to pass through more easily, and when the rain eventually stopped, he took a mop and swept out any water that had made its way inside.

“Customers who live nearby offered assistance,” says Mr Sarratore. “By this morning, the place was dry and we opened as usual.”

Nearby, on Tennyson Street, an employee at the local Laird’s Pharmacy is squeezing water out of towels that had earlier lined the front door of the shop.

Inside, between serving her customers, owner Dr. Elizabeth Foo says it’s hard to estimate the cost of the damage to her newly inaugurated store.

Stock that had been shelved low to the ground was ruined. She returned to work today to discover the fridge had exceeded the optimal temperature for storing medicines — which she suspects may have occurred due to a temporary power outage — and now she must go through that stock to see if it is still viable. Meanwhile, the carpets will need to be cleaned to avoid any fungal infections.

Not only had water made its way through the two entrances to the store, despite her efforts to lay rolled-up towels at the doors, it had seeped through the roof, too.

“I put buckets on the bench to collect the water,” she says.

The flood comes just one month after the store was officially inaugurated by the Victorian Premier, Daniel Andrews, says Dr. Foo with pride, showing off photos of the occasion.

A few doors down, the washing machines are spinning at Tennyson Street Laundry. Just yesterday evening, manager Tobias Kilsby had been sweeping out water that flowed over the drain, through the back door, past the washing machines, and out the laundromat’s front entrance.

Fortunately, there was no damage to the machinery. “They’re industrial grade and their machines sit high up off the ground,” explains Mr Kilsby.

The small businesses on Ormond Road, Elwood’s main shopping strip, appear to have gotten through the flash flood scot-free.

“The water rose up high where the cars are parked outside, but it didn’t make it past the footpath,” explains Joanna Pidcock, who works at The Grumpy Swimmer bookstore.

“That was lucky for us, because water could do a lot of damage to our stock,” she says with a smile, looking at all the books and gift items stored on shelves down to the floor.

Some neighbouring stores hadn’t taken any chances. While their shopfronts bear signs saying, “Taking a break for Christmas. See you in 2017,” sandbags and towels line the front doors.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Jul 22

Melbourne weather: Small businesses wade through floods in hard-hit Elwood

Andrew Sarratore had a plan to spare Jerry’s Milk Bar in Elwood from the freak storm. Photo: Penny Stephens A warning sign for motorists at the front of Jerry’s Milk Bar. Photo: Aimee Amiga
Nanjing Night Net

Dr Elizbeth Foo says it’s hard to estimate the cost of the damage to Laird’s Pharmacy in Elwood. Photo: Penny Stephens

Tobias Kilsby, manager of the Tennyson Street Laundry, had a lot of sweeping to do but was one of the luckier small business operators. Photo: Penny Stephens

Walking into Jerry’s Milk Bar on Friday morning, one could be mistaken that Thursday’s flash floods were a distant memory. The floors of the iconic Elwood cafe are dry, the coffee machine is brewing, and customers are streaming in and out of the front door.

Perhaps that’s because owner Andrew Sarratore has learned his lesson. Being the third time since he bought the century-old business in 2010 that it fell victim to flash flooding, he now knows what to do to avoid costly damage.

On his first day in business, Mr Sarratore recalls, heavy rain immersed the place in water, sending what he estimates as $20,000 worth of supplies — eggs, fruit and fresh vegetables — sailing through the store. It took him six days to clean the mess.

Four years later, when wild storms lashed the suburb, water gushed up from the drains and streamed down the road from the nearby canal, flooding the cafe again.

But this year, as he heard the rain pummel down and the canal break its banks, Mr Sarratore knew what to do.

He put crates on the road to divert traffic away from the water that had built up on the side of the road, as it struggled to make its way down the drains. To the crates he added a sign that read, “Please slow down… or no coffee tomorrow.” And he put sandbags at each of the property’s three entrances to prevent the water from making its way under the doors.

He then took a shovel and stroked the drains outside, in an effort to enable the water to pass through more easily, and when the rain eventually stopped, he took a mop and swept out any water that had made its way inside.

“Customers who live nearby offered assistance,” says Mr Sarratore. “By this morning, the place was dry and we opened as usual.”

Nearby, on Tennyson Street, an employee at the local Laird’s Pharmacy is squeezing water out of towels that had, moments earlier, lined the front door of the shop.

Inside, between serving her customers, owner Dr. Elizabeth Foo says it’s hard to estimate the cost of the damage to her newly inaugurated store.

Stock that had been shelved low to the ground was ruined. She returned to work today to discover the fridge had exceeded the optimal temperature for storing medicines — which she suspects may have occurred due to a temporary power outage — and now she must go through that stock to see if it is still viable. Meanwhile, the carpets will need to be dry cleaned to avoid any fungal infections.

Not only had water made its way through the two entrances to the premises, despite her efforts to lay rolled-up towels by the doors, it had seeped through the roof, too. “I put buckets on the bench to collect the water,” she says.

The flood comes just one month after the store was inaugurated by the Victorian Premier, Daniel Andrews, says Dr. Foo with pride, showing off photos of the momentous occasion.

A few doors down, the washing machines are spinning at Tennyson Street Laundry. Just yesterday evening, manager Tobias Kilsby had been sweeping out water that flowed over the drain, through the back door, past the washing machines, and out the laundromat’s front entrance.

Fortunately, there was no damage to the machinery. “They’re industrial grade and their motors sit high up off the ground,” explains Kilsby.

The small businesses on Ormond Road, Elwood’s main shopping strip, appear to have gotten through the flash flood scot-free.

“The water rose up high where the cars are parked outside, but it didn’t make it past the footpath,” explains Joanna Pidcock, a sales representative at The Grumpy Swimmer bookstore.

“That was lucky for us, because water could do a lot of damage to our stock,” she says with a smile, looking at all the books and gift items stored on shelves down to the floor.

Nonetheless, some neighbouring stores hadn’t taken any chances. While their shopfronts bear signs saying, “Taking a break for Christmas. See you in 2017,” sandbags and towels line the front doors.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Jul 22

Christmas gift takes the long way round

Bridie and Oliver Booth with their new T-ball set, which was found in Richmond on Boxing Day. Picture: Kimberlee BoothOliver Booth and his sister Bridie are enjoying their new T-ball set. Getting it, which took some hard work.
Nanjing Night Net

Bridie Booth (5) with her brother Oliver (2). Photo: Supplied by Kez Stephenson

The Christmas gift destined for two-year-oldOliver was found in Richmond on Boxing Day after it fell out of his relatives’ car boot.

An anonymous man handed the present in atWindsor Police Station, as he waskeen to deliver it to the rightful owner.

The man had posted information about the present on social media, but had not any luck finding the right person.

A card attached to the present indicated the giftwas intended for a person named Oliver.

The Hawkesbury Local Area Command posted on Facebook about the missing item on Monday afternoon.

Within two hours, the command received a response from Oliver’s cousin Kez Stephenson.

On Facebook, Ms Stephenson wrote that her family had picked up the present and would give it to Oliver as soon as possible.

A screenshot of the Hawkesbury Local Area Command’s call out on Facebook.

Ms Stephenson told the Hawkesbury Gazette the present was intended for two-year-old Oliver Booth.

She said the present had fallen out of the family’s car on Christmas Day.

“Our boot popped open when we were driving to the family’s Christmas lunch and the present must have fallen out then,” she said.

“We didn’t notice it was missing until we were handing out presents and one of Oliver’s was missing.”

Oliver’sgrandmother delivered the present to him on Tuesday, much to the delight of Oliver and Bridie.

Oliver’s cousin Kez StephensonRobin Graham:Good work to the person who found it and turned it in. Honesty has been found.

Peter Tilbrook:Definate (sic) legend the honest bloke. Your blood is worth bottling.

Lost propertyHave you lost an item?

The NSW Police Force has now established an community portal for people to make an online report re-discover lost property.

To find out more, visithttps://portal.police.nsw.gov419论坛/

– The Hawkesbury Gazette

Jul 22

Farmer fury at ‘vigilante’ do-gooders

File photo from a piggery.A Riverina pig farmer has criticised “vigilante activists” who break the law in search of sensational photos and videos.
Nanjing Night Net

Peter Cartwright has owned Pine Park Piggery near Temora for more than 30 years and is just one of 38 farmers targeted by animal liberationists who seek to expose cruel practices.

However, Mr Cartwright said he’d had hundreds of vet students through the farm over the years and wasn’t trying to hide anything.

“I checked with a consultant vet in Wagga, he looked and said unless we’d changed things dramatically we hadnothing to worry about,” Mr Cartwright said.

“We’ve opened our doors and if (the activists) had the decency to ask we’d probably have given them coffee, brekky and a guided tour, but like mongrel dogs they sneak in.”

Mr Cartwright isn’t alone in his criticism. For years, farmers have complained of break-ins and they were discussed at a private meeting between Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce and NSW police, RSPCA and NSW Farmers last year.

A summary of the meeting said piggeries in the area, along with poultry farms in other states, were known to have been “invaded for the purpose of installing unauthorised surveillance devices, ostensibly to ‘reveal’ animal husbandry practice believed to be poor”.

Outspoken animal activist Lisa Ryan had previously told Fairfax Mediathat activists were “forced to act” when regulatory bodies failed to do so.

“Theybecome so frustrated they feel they have a moral and ethical obligation to inform the community and public about what’s going on,” Ms Ryan said.“Exposing animal abuse is a very non-violent approach. If you’ve got nothing to hide then what’s the problem?”

Mr Cartwright said the activists thought they were above the law.

“Most pig farmers I know try to do the right thing, it’s in our interest to have the animals in their best condition,” he said.

“I’ve had pigs since I could stand up, I’ve been here 35 years and when people say I don’t love these animals it makes me angry.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Jul 22

Farmer fury at ‘vigilante’ do-gooders

File photo from a piggery.A Riverina pig farmer has criticised “vigilante activists” who break the law in search of sensational photos and videos.
Nanjing Night Net

Peter Cartwright has owned Pine Park Piggery near Temora for more than 30 years and is just one of 38 farmers targeted by animal liberationists who seek to expose cruel practices.

However, Mr Cartwright said he’d had hundreds of vet students through the farm over the years and wasn’t trying to hide anything.

“I checked with a consultant vet in Wagga, he looked and said unless we’d changed things dramatically we hadnothing to worry about,” Mr Cartwright said.

“We’ve opened our doors and if (the activists) had the decency to ask we’d probably have given them coffee, brekky and a guided tour, but like mongrel dogs they sneak in.”

Mr Cartwright isn’t alone in his criticism. For years, farmers have complained of break-ins and they were discussed at a private meeting between Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce and NSW police, RSPCA and NSW Farmers last year.

A summary of the meeting said piggeries in the area, along with poultry farms in other states, were known to have been “invaded for the purpose of installing unauthorised surveillance devices, ostensibly to ‘reveal’ animal husbandry practice believed to be poor”.

Outspoken animal activist Lisa Ryan had previously told Fairfax Mediathat activists were “forced to act” when regulatory bodies failed to do so.

“Theybecome so frustrated they feel they have a moral and ethical obligation to inform the community and public about what’s going on,” Ms Ryan said.“Exposing animal abuse is a very non-violent approach. If you’ve got nothing to hide then what’s the problem?”

Mr Cartwright said the activists thought they were above the law.

“Most pig farmers I know try to do the right thing, it’s in our interest to have the animals in their best condition,” he said.

“I’ve had pigs since I could stand up, I’ve been here 35 years and when people say I don’t love these animals it makes me angry.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.